Entitled millennials want full-time work with lots of benefits

Entitled millennials want full-time work with lots of benefits – while also demanding flexible hours and time off whenever they choose, study reveals

  • Survey found that flexibility was important to a majority of younger workers
  • Despite demands, millennials are finding it hard to find work with flexibility
  • Half of respondents said they didn’t have freedom to decide when they worked

Job-seeking millennials are demanding benefits including flexible hours and time off whenever they request it, according to a study.

A YouGov study found that flexibility was important to most workers aged under 40.

But despite the popularity of the benefits, many workers say they are finding it hard to find flexibility in their jobs.

Half of respondents to a Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILA) survey said they did not have the freedom to decide when they worked.

Millennials are demanding benefits including flexible hours and time off whenever they request it when looking for full-time work (stock image)

Deliveroo spokesman Levi Aron – whose company commissioned the YouGov research – said employers needed to meet the demands of young workers.

‘Not only do a majority of Australians value flexibility, but nearly half say that they would be influenced by good benefits when choosing a company,’ Mr Aron told news.com.au.

Many workers say they are finding it hard to find flexibility in their jobs.

Melbourne University academic and director of the HILA survey Professor Mark Wooden said employee flexibility had remained constant since 2001.

‘I would think that the only reason you might think that we have all this flexibility are changes in the occupational structure. There are a lot fewer blue-collar jobs, where going to the toilet had to be well planned,’ he said.

Mr Wooden said unions had argued that flexibility in the workplace favours the employer, and has led to the rise of casual working conditions.

Many workers say they are finding it hard to find flexibility in their jobs (stock image)

‘We’ve seen a big reduction in people working too many hours, but we’ve seen a big increase in underemployment since the global financial crisis,’ he said.

However, Emeritus Professor at the Australian National University Bob Gregory said young people have ‘never had it better in terms of the availability of flexible jobs’.

‘If you want a full-time job – a full-time job you can treat casually – well, that’s going away. The labour market is splitting into two types of job,’ he said.

‘Full-time jobs are getting more full-time – when you want flexibility, then you’ve got to find it in the part-time labour market.’

The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey follows the same group of more than 17,000 Australians over the course of their lives, beginning in 2001.

Half of survey respondents said they did not have the freedom to decide when they worked (stock image)

What is the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey?

The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is Australia’s first nationally representative household-based longitudinal survey.

HILDA provides longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents on a wide range of aspects of life around family dynamics, economic and subjective well-being and labour market dynamics.

The survey commenced in 2001 and data is collected annually through interviews with all people over 15 years old in each selected household.

The HILDA Survey is conducted by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne on behalf of the Department of Social Services, with data collection conducted by Roy Morgan Research.

Source: Department of Social Services

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