Townhouse where Queen Victoria's coronation gown was worked on

London townhouse laced with royal history! Home where the silk for Queen Victoria’s coronation gown was worked on is on the rental market for £3,000 per week (and comes with its own gardener)

  • The stunning London townhouse in Fournier Street, was built during the reign of George I in 1726 
  • Later leased by the Huguenot weavers Signeratt and Bourdillon, who worked on the silk for Victoria’s gown
  • The property now includes a mammoth kitchen, an Aga, two dishwashers, marble basins and a cast-iron bath 

The London townhouse where the silk for Queen Victoria’s coronation gown was made is on the rental market for an eye-watering £3,000 per week. 

The house in Fournier Street, was built during the reign of George I in 1726, and later leased by the Huguenot weavers Signeratt and Bourdillon, who worked in the attic on the silk for the monarch’s dress for her coronation on 28 June 1838. 

Having recently underwent a restoration, the property now includes a mammoth kitchen, an Aga, two dishwashers, marble basins, a cast-iron bath, a wine fridge and modern luxuries such as app-controlled underfloor heating and air-conditioning.

The street – which sits between Brick Lane and Commercial Street in East London – has been home to some of the city’s wealthiest and poorest; many of its first residents were Huguenot weavers, Protestant exiles from France.

The London townhouse (pictured) where the silk for Queen Victoria’s coronation gown was made is on the rental market for an eye-watering £3,000 per week 

Inside the home’s massive kitchen fitted with a a central island, pendant lighting and an electric three-oven Aga. The brickwork gives a rustic feel, while it’s roomy enough to accomodate a seating area with a velvet sofa 

The garden has been completely transformed in recent years and is now a flower-filled green space, featuring mulberry trees, peonies and flowering jasmine. It was transformed by Miria Harris, and has featured in House & Garden magazine

Ben Adler was responsible for the property’s latest makeover, who fell in love with the Grade-II listed storey building when he set eyes on it. Pictured:  A living area with wooden flooring and statement artwork 

The property was originally built during the reign of George I in 1726 but underwent a major refurbishment in 2013. The eccletic decor combines traditional furniture with modern art pieces 

The rent also includes a gardener who is in charge of the upkeep of the stunning back garden (pictured)

The home is an eight minute walk away from Liverpool Lime Street and is wedged between Brick Lane and Commercial Street. PIctured: The open plan living area off the kitchem, complete with flagstone floors 

The abode is fitted out with a glazed loft, which helped skilled weavers and people in the silk trade who needed to work with a constant source of light. Coincidentally the attic is the place where the silk for the gown of Queen Victoria’s coronation was created.

All of this plus a gardener and the use of the furniture comes at an astonishing £3,000 per week or £156,000 per annum.

Owner and one time TV producer Ben Adler will not sell up but is rarely there, spending most of his time on the road with his fiancee and opera singer. 

Almost 300 years ago the building was created by William Taylor before being loaned to Signeratt and Bourdillon. 

One of the dining rooms with brocade dining chairs, dark wood panelling and different types of art adorning the walls, including a large-scale still life and a more traditional landscape over the fireplace

Almost 300 years ago the building (pictured) was created by William Taylor before being loaned to Signeratt and Bourdillon. It features a stunning wooden staircase with ornate carvings 

The kitchen’s interior is fitted with stone tiles, a wooden table, Georgian windows and a bare brick wall in the corner

Owner Ben Adler’s efforts and investment – which ran into seven figures – earned him and the house an RICS Building Conservation Award of 2018. PIctured: The first floor living area, overlooking Fournier street, with grey panelling and green decor accents, including a statement rug 

The oak staircase leading to the first floor is complimented by a large still life of flowers and an industrial-style pendant lantern  

A large bed and bedroom with a few rugs, paned windows, various paintings and artwork on the walls is found in the home

Another spacious open bedroom with two bright coloured chairs, paned windows, a large bed with a pink and purple duvet 

The bathroom is fitted with a cast-iron bath (pictured). During the 1980s the property was stripped back, ripped up and starved of care but the owner wanted to renovate it straight away

When did Queen Victoria’s coronation take place?

Queen Victoria’s coronation was a huge occasion and some 400,000 visitors went to London to see the new Queen crowned after her uncle, King William IV died in 1837. 

She was crowned on 28 June 1838, aged just 19.  

The ceremony took five hours and she wore a white dress for the occasion.

Ben Adler was responsible for the property’s latest makeover, who fell in love with the Grade-II listed storey building when he set eyes on it.

During the 1980s the property was stripped back, ripped up and starved of care but he wanted to renovate it straight away. 

He told the Spectator the more modern touches made sure the place felt like a home and not a ‘museum’. 

The former producer’s efforts and investment – which ran into seven figures – earned him and the house an RICS Building Conservation Award of 2018.

Just before the work started structural engineers found a ‘massive’ amount of steelwork would be needed to prop up the Georgian property and guarantee its structural integrity. 

This job was meant to take a few months but ended up taking two and a half years. 

About the area, house and his late wife, Alder said: ‘When she died in 2017, I felt very much looked after by the neighbourhood: people brought me flowers and cakes and meals, and I deeply appreciated that. 

‘The new tenants will be amazed that this kind of warmth can exist in sight of the City.’

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