Degree from Russell Group universities can boost salary by 13%

Degree from Russell Group universities can boost salary by 13%, as average graduate makes up to £50,000 five years after leaving

  • Attendees earn around £40K a year for women and £50K for men five years on
  • By contrast, graduates from lowest earning institutions take home below £20K
  • Stats were shared yesterday by Sam Gyimah, the universities minister, at the Higher Education Policy Institute conference in London

Graduates from Russell Group universities earn around 13 per cent more on average than those from other similar institutions.

Figures show those from the highest earning universities make an average of around £40,000 a year for women and more than £50,000 for men five years after leaving.

By contrast, graduates from the lowest earning institutions typically take home below £20,000, according to figures published by the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Sam Gyimah, the universities minister, warned too many universities were getting ‘bums on seats’ for worthless courses

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They were shared yesterday by Sam Gyimah, the universities minister, at the Higher Education Policy Institute conference in London. He warned too many universities were getting ‘bums on seats’ for worthless courses.

The data, which breaks down earnings for courses at each university, shows those in the elite Russell Group – including Leeds, Southampton, King’s College London and Cardiff – tend to produce the best graduate salaries. Overall, their graduates have earnings 10 to 13 per cent higher on average than those who studied at other institutions with the same characteristics.

Women who took one of the bottom 100 courses have earnings up to 64 per cent less – around £17,000 – than for the average degree. For men, the figure is 67 per cent, or £21,000.

Economics and medicine students earn around 60 per cent more than history and English students five years after graduation – around £40,000 a year compared to £25,000. Those who studied creative arts, social care and media earn the least, at around £20,000.

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