Ed Tait’s Five Things to Know for Sunday’s Grey Cup

This is it! What Winnipeg Blue Bomber fans have been waiting eight years for.

Celebrating Grey Cup Sunday with their beloved Blue and Gold playing in the championship game, and Bomber Nation is hoping Mike O’Shea’s troops can pull off a minor upset, and provide this town and province with a reason to hold a victory parade for the first time since the 50-11 blowout of Edmonton back in 1990 at BC Place Stadium.

The 680 CJOB Broadcast crew of Bob Irving, Doug Brown, Christian Aumell, and Greg Mackling are in Calgary for Grey Cup week — and they will anchor the Pregame show from 3-5 p.m. on Sunday.

They will then bring you post-game analysis and reaction from Calgary, and here in Winnipeg immediately following the game at about 8:30 p.m.

So without further adieu, we present our final edition of the Five Things You Should Know from Director of Digital Content for Bluebombers.com, Ed Tait.

5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW

1. The Bombers and Tiger-Cats meet Sunday in the 107th Grey Cup in what should be a dandy showdown featuring two iconic Canadian Football League franchises. This will be the 11th time, dating back to 1935, when the two clubs were known as the ‘Winnipegs’ and ‘Tigers’ that these two teams will be pitted against each other for the Grey Cup.

Winnipeg has a 6-4 record in championship games against Hamilton, including owning the Ticats during the glory years of the late ’50s-early ’60s with wins in 1958, 1959, 1961 and 1962. The two teams also met in the 1957 and 1965 Grey Cups during that era, with those two games won by the Ticats. The last Grey Cup featuring these two teams was in 1984, with the Bombers ending what was then their longest championship drought, at 22 years.

2. The 100-plus years of the Grey Cup means there have been a number of memorable games — so memorable, in fact, that they have earned nicknames. The Bombers lost to Toronto in the 1950 title game, known as ‘The Mud Bowl’ because of awful field conditions and have also played in the ‘Fog Bowl’ — which took two days to complete because of the fog that shrouded old Exhibition Stadium in Toronto, while the 1965 game was dubbed ‘The Wind Bowl’ for fairly obvious reasons.

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