Hurricane tracker: Horror satellite map shows TEN threatening storms churning right now

The 2019 hurricane season in the Pacifice and Atlantic has seen 26 tropical depressions, 23 storms and nine hurricanes develop. The worst of these storms was Hurricane Dorian, which slammed the northern Bahamian islands of Abaco and Great Bahama, killing 50, while hundreds of people are still missing. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is currently monitoring one hurricane, three tropical storms, two tropical depressions and four disturbances – but what is the status on each of these potentially life-endangering systems? Express.co.uk has all the details on each of these swirling vortexes, from their path and track to their current location – read on to find out more.

Hurricane Humberto

Hurricane Humberto first formed as a disturbance last week when it was located northeast of the Lesser Antilles.

On Monday, the tropical storm rapidly intensified into a Category 1 hurricane as it continued to track closer to the southeastern US coastline.

The National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) latest advisory issued at 2am EDT (7am BST) reported Humberto’s location as near latitude 31.5 north, longitude 70.4 west, which is approximately 330 miles west of Bermuda.

Humberto has wind speeds of 115mph which equates to a major Category 3 hurricane, according to the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The storm is moving east northeast towards Bermuda at 12mph and is expected to unleash strong winds onto the region later today.

The NOAA advisory reads: “This general motion with a gradual increase in forward speed is expected through early Thursday, followed by a northeastward to north-northeastward motion through Friday.

“On the forecast track, the core of Humberto is expected to pass just to the northwest and north of Bermuda Wednesday night.

“Maximum sustained winds are near 115mph (185 kmh) with higher gusts.

“Humberto is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

“Some fluctuations in intensity are likely during the next day or so, but Humberto should remain a powerful hurricane through early Thursday.

“A steady weakening trend should begin later on Thursday.

“Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95km) from the centre and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 175 miles (280km).

“NOAA Buoy 41048 located just to the east of Humberto recently reported sustained winds of 47mph (76 kmh) with a wind gust of 63 mph (101 km/h) and pressure falling rapidly.”

The hazardous conditions threatening lives associated with the storm include hurricane-force winds, heavy rainfall, large swells and storm surge.

The hurricane-force winds are expected to reach Bermuda by Wednesday night and continue into early Thursday morning.

Winds are expected to first reach tropical-storm strength by Wednesday afternoon, making outside preparations difficult or dangerous.

Rainfall of up to six inches is expected to hit Bermuda while large swells generated by Humberto will increase along the coast of Bermuda by Wednesday.

These dangerous breaking waves, especially along south-facing beaches, will be possible Wednesday night into Thursday and could cause coastal flooding.

The swells will also continue to impact the northwestern Bahamas and the southeastern coast of the United States from east-central Florida to North Carolina during the next couple of days and could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Storm surge and breaking waves is forecast to raise water levels by one to three feet above normal tide levels along the immediate southern coast of Bermuda.

Tropical Storm Kiko

Tropical Storm Kiko has weakened from a hurricane into a tropical storm over the past few days.

According to the latest NOAA update issued at 8pm PDT (4am BST), Kiko was located near latitude 16.7 north, longitude 125.5 west, roughly 1100 miles west southwest of the southern tip of Baja, California.

Kiko had maximum sustained winds of 50mph and was moving southwestwards at 5mph.

The advisory reads: “It is expected to turn toward the west-southwest and west by Thursday, followed by a turn toward the west-northwest on Friday.

“Maximum sustained winds are near 50mph (85 kmh) with higher gusts. Little change in strength is expected during the next day or so.

“Strengthening is anticipated to begin by late Wednesday, and Kiko could become a hurricane by late Friday.

“Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles (75km) to the north of the centre.”

Tropical Storm Mario

Tropical Storm Mario is currently whirling across the eastern north Pacific Ocean, moving northwestward with no change in strength, around 670 miles south of the southern tip of Baja, California.

The NOAA update issued at 9pm MDT (4am BST) reads: “A northwestward motion with a decrease in forward speed is expected during the next several days, with Mario becoming nearly stationary by late Friday.

“Maximum sustained winds are near 40mph (65kmh) with higher gusts.

“Some strengthening is forecast during the next few days, and Mario is expected to become a hurricane by Friday.

“Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35km) from the centre.”

Tropical Storm Lorena

Tropical Storm Lorena is forecast to cause heavy rain over portions of the Mexican states of Guerrero, Michoacan, Colima and Jalisco during the next few days, which may produce life-threatening flash flooding and mudslides.

Currently, tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110km) from the centre.

Lorena is moving northwestwards towards the southwestern coast of Mexico and was at 1am CDT (7am BST) located roughly 160 miles south southwest of Zihuatanejo, Mexico.

The storm currently has maximum sustained wind speeds of 50mph and these are expected to strength to 69mph through Saturday.

The advisory reads: “ A slower northwestward motion is expected during the next couple of days.

“Lorena is forecast to move near or over the southwestern coast of Mexico late Wednesday or early Thursday.”

Tropical Depression Imelda

Imelda is moving father inland and is unleashing heavy rains and life-threatening flash flooding will continue to spread inland over southeast Texas during the next day or two.

The last NHC advisory, issued at 10pm CDT (4am BST) recorded Imelda’s location as around 10 miles north west of Houston, Texas, with maximum sustained winds of 35mph.

The advisory reads: “Gradual weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, and the system should become a remnant low by late Thursday.”

Tropical Depression Imelda is likely to produce rainfall of up to 18 inches in isolated areas of the upper coastal region of Texas with up to 10 inches expected across southeast Texas and southwest Louisiana through Thursday.

This may cause life-threatening flash flooding along portions of the Upper Texas Coast, including the Houston and Galveston areas.

Tropical Depression Ten

Tropical Depression Ten is gradually growing better organised while it moves west northwestwards.

Forecasters predict the storm, which was at 11pm AST (4am BST) located 1030 miles east of the Leeward Islands, will strengthen over the coming days reaching around 86mph by Monday.

Although it is currently too soon to determine if there will be any direct hits to the islands.

The NHC update reads: “The depression is moving toward the west-northwest near 10mph (17kmh).

“A west-northwestward motion at a somewhat faster forward speed is expected over the next few days.

“On the forecast track, the system will be near the northern Leeward Islands Thursday night or Friday.

“Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph (55 km/h) with higher gusts.

“Strengthening is forecast during the next couple of days, and the depression is expected to become a tropical storm by Wednesday morning.

“The system is forecast to become a hurricane by the time it moves near the northern Leeward Islands.”

Disturbance one

The first disturbance is located in the eastern Pacific and it is an elongated trough of low pressure lying near the coast of southeastern Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador which is producing a large area of disorganised cloudiness and showers that extends several hundred miles southward over the Pacific waters.

The system is expected to gradually develop during the next several days, and a tropical depression could form over the weekend while moving westward at five to 10 mph.

Heavy rainfall is possible along the coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala and southeastern Mexico during the next few days.

The NOAA forecasts the chance of formation through 48 hours at near zero percent, but says the chance of formation through five days is 40 percent.

Disturbance two

The second disturbance being monitored by the NHC is in the central Pacific.

This system involves showers and thunderstorms associated with an area of low pressure around 500 miles southwest of Honolulu.

Environmental conditions are expected to be marginally conducive for some development over the next 24 hours as the system moves toward the north northwest.

By late Wednesday or Thursday, chances for development drop off significantly as the low interacts with another disturbance approaching from the northwest.

Regardless of development, this system is expected to bring locally gusty winds and heavy rain to portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument over the next several days.

The NOAA predicts the chance of formation over 48 and/or five days as 40 percent.

Disturbance three

The next disturbance being monitored is also located in the central Pacific, roughly 830 miles west southwest of Kauai.

The system involves showers and thunderstorms associated with an elongated area of low pressure, which remains disorganised.

The disturbance is expected to slowly move northeast into unfavourable environmental conditions and by late Wednesday or Thursday, chances for development drop off significantly as the low interacts with another disturbance approaching from the northwest.

This system is expected to bring locally gusty winds and heavy rain to portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument over the next several days.

The NOAA records the chance of formation over 48 and/or five days as 20 percent.

Disturbance four

The last disturbance being monitored is an elongated area of low pressure lies around 700 miles southeast of Hilo, Hawaii.

Slow development is possible during the next several days while the area slowly moves northwestward, though the environmental conditions are only marginally favourable.

The chance of formation through 48 hours is near 0 percent, while the chance of formation through five days is 20 percent.

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