Norway’s PM warns Britain NOT to try and copy their model 

Norway’s PM warns Britain NOT to try and copy their model of being outside the EU but inside the single market because it means Brussels gets to impose rules

  • Norway is outside the EU but follows rules through the European Economic Area
  • Norwegian PM Erna Solberg said the plan worked well for her small country
  • But she said it would be less appropriate for a major economy like Britain  
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Norway’s Prime Minister has urged Britain not to embrace her country’s model of being outside the EU but inside the single market.

Erna Solberg said it meant Brussels imposed rules on Norway without the country getting a formal say in how they are made.

Ms Solberg – who supports Norway becoming a full member of the bloc – said the European Economic Area (EEA) was the best available model for small countries on the edge of Europe.

But she questioned whether Britain would or should accept being dictated to. 


Norway’s Prime Minister Erna Solberg (file image) has urged Britain not to embrace her country’s model of being outside the EU but inside the single market

Norway is one of a small number of countries in the EEA without being in the EU. It has to accept single market rules, including free movement of people.

It is seen by Remain supporters as a way of delivering Brexit while limiting damage to economic ties between Britain and the continent. 

But speaking at a Politico event in Brussels, Ms Solberg said: ‘Then I should just ask why … should you leave the EU if you’re accepting that?’ 

Warning Britain would not be allowed to build its own model, she added: ‘We do agree with the EU that you cannot be cherry-picking.

‘Norway is outside [the EU], but we are inside the single market … We do accept that decisions on the four freedoms are done in Brussels.’

‘You can’t just opt out of one of the freedoms.’

Ms Solberg said Britain had a much bigger economy than Norway and other EEA members Iceland and Lichenstein.


Prime Minister Theresa May (pictured in Downing Street today) has rejected keeping Britain in a Norway-style relationship with the EU but is under pressure from Remain rebels 

She said: ‘We believe we have the best system in the world, but we know we are small and that big countries decide,’ she said.

‘That might be a little bit more difficult for a larger country.’ 

The premier added: The EEA is the only organisation in which Norway is a super power.


The EEA plan looks doomed to fail after Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn (pictured at the GMB conference today) produced his own amendment blocking the arrangement

‘Losing that is of course of [big] importance — then Britain becomes a super power in that organisation.’

Remain MPs are desperate to defend an amendment to the EU Withdrawal Bill that seeks to keep Britain in the EEA.

The effort looks doomed to fail after Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn produced his own amendment blocking the arrangement. 

Chuka Umunna said it was in the hands of Labour’s frontbench whether the option of an EEA deal remained on the table.

The Labour MP said: ‘Whether the UK continues to participate in the single market through the EEA is now in the hands of the Labour frontbench.

‘This is a very unusual position but it is by dint of the fact this is a hung Parliament, tight parliamentary arithmetic and we live in quite extraordinary times.

‘The option of us continuing to participate in the single market is only dead insofar as the Labour frontbench seek to adopt that position and I sincerely hope.’    

What customs arrangements do Norway, Turkey and Switzerland have with the EU?

Theresa May has insisted Brexit means quitting the EU customs union – so the UK can strike free trade deals with other countries.

But  this means that customs checks on goods will probably need to be carried out at the border – creating the spectre of long border queues.

Critics of the PM’s approach say the UK should stay in a customs union with the bloc to avoid these hard border controls.

Below are three customs deals the EU  has done with countries outside the bloc:

The Norway Option: 

Norway voted narrowly against joining the EU in 1994, but shares a 1000-mile border with Sweden which is in the bloc.

The Norwegian government decided to negotiate a deal which gave it very close ties with the EU. 

It is part of the EU single market which means it must accept EU rules on the free movement of people.

But it is not in the customs union – meaning it sets its own tariffs on customs coming from outside the EU and so must carry out border checks.

There are some 1,300 customs officials who are involved in policing the border with Sweden, and have invested substantial amounts in technology to make these as quick and smooth as possible.

They have IT systems which pre-declare goods to customs and they are developing a system which will allow lorries carrying pre-declared goods to be waved through. 

Norway also pays large amounts into the EU budget and is governed by the court of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA).


Switzerland (border pictured) is not in the EU customs union – which means that checks on goods crossing over the border from non-EU countries are carried 

The Switzerland Option:

Switzerland is one of the EU’s longest-standing trading partners, but the  country voted against joining the bloc in 2001.

It is a member of the EU single market and has signed up to the Schengen area – meaning it must accept free movement rules and does not carry out passport check on other member countries. 

But it is not in the EU customs union – which means that checks on goods crossing over the border from non-EU countries are carried out.

The situation tosses up some anomalies. For instance, a passenger travelling through Geneva Airport can rent a car on the French side of the border for around half of the cost of renting it on the Swiss side.

Border checks are carried out on goods but customs officials say they use intelligence to carry out spot checks, which can be carried out several miles from the border. 

However, there can be long delays as goods are checked at the border.

The Turkey Option: 


Turkey(its border with Bulgaria pictured) has long eyed up membership of the EU and first tried to start the lengthy application process to join in 1987.

Turkey has long eyed up membership of the EU and first tried to start the lengthy application process to join in 1987.

The country signed a customs union with the bloc in 1995 – a move Turkey’s rulers hoped would be a stepping stone on the way to full membership.

Turkey’s hopes to join the bloc faded over the past few years and have been all but abandoned under President Erdogan after he instigated a major purge of political opponents in the wake of the failed coup against him in 2016.

Under its customs union Turkey must follow EU rules on the production of goods without a say in making them.

It also means that Turkey can only strike free trade deals on goods which are negotiated by Brussels.   

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