Plymouth shooter's dad begged police to take away son's gun licence

Plymouth shooter Jake Davison’s father reveals he begged police FIVE YEARS AGO to take his son’s shotgun licence away – as he says he’s ‘sorry and ashamed’ of the Incel killer

  • The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) are investigating the firearm licensing procedures of Devon and Cornwall Police after the incident in August 
  • Jake Davison, 22, killed his mother in her home in Plymouth and then four others 
  • His father Mark Davison, said he begged police to take away his shot gun and license in 2017 – five years before his bodybuilder son killed five people 
  • Devon and Cornwall Police said they are cooperating with the investigation  

The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) have launched an investigation into firearm’s licensing procedures after the father of a man who shot five people dead begged officers to take away his son’s shotgun license – five years before he went on a shooting spree. 

Jake Davison, 22, killed his mother in her home and then four others, including a three-year-old girl, outside the property in Keyham, Plymouth, in August. 

Self-described ‘f***ing fat ugly virgin’ and bodybuilder Davison, murdered his mother Maxine, 51, after bursting into her home in the Devon city with a pump-action shotgun. 

Mark Davison (pictured with his son Jake) said he asked police to take away his son’s shotgun and license in 2017 

Without saying a word Davison, dressed in black, then gunned down Sophie Martyn, 3, and her father Lee, 43, who were walking up the road.

After murdering the pair, Davison walked to an adjacent area of parkland and opened fire on dogwalker Stephen Washington, 59, before killing Kate Shepherd, 66, outside of Blush hair salon.

He then turned the gun on himself, concluding his 12-minute bloody rampage that was the worst mass shooting seen in Britain since 2010.

The killings happened just weeks after Devon and Cornwall Police returned Davison’s shotgun and licence to him. 

Police seized them after Davison assaulted two teens in a park in 2020. 

IOPC is investigating how the force could have approved his application and then returned his weapon and license to him. Devon and Cornwall Police have said they are co-operating with the investigation. 

IOPC is investigating how the force could have approved his application and then returned his weapon and license to him

The killings happened just weeks after Devon and Cornwall Police returned Davison’s shotgun and licence to him


Jake Davison, 22, killed his mother in her home and then four others, including a three-year-old girl, outside the property in Keyham, Plymouth, in August 

His father, Mark Davison, said he told police in 2017 he didn’t think his son should be allowed to own a shotgun, and that he had concerns about his mental health. 

‘I told them. I said I don’t want him to have a shotgun,’ he told the BBC. 

‘I said I remember him asking me for an air rifle when he was younger. I said ‘I’m not buying you a point 22 air rifle son… without me there to supervise that’.

‘Why did he even need one in the first place? He lived in the city.’ 

Mr Davison, who turned his own life around after spending time in prison, added that he is ‘sorry and ashamed’ of his son. 

‘I don’t know what was going on with him,’ he said. ‘If I could say sorry any better than I can, if I could change it I really would. I am sorry and I am ashamed.’   

Mr Davison, is allegedly a violent thug who was once jailed for assaulting a fisherman in the Shetland Islands seven years ago.

He and Maxine were divorced at the time of the shooting. 

Five people were killed during the shooting spree in Plymouth in August 

An IOPC spokesperson said: ‘We can confirm we have spoken to Mr Davison and his statement that he made a call to Devon and Cornwall Police has been considered and reported on as part of our independent investigation.’ 

A spokesperson for Devon and Cornwall Police said: ‘Individual contacts with Jake Davison by members of his family, members of the public or agencies that are known to us, or exist within our systems, form part of that investigation,’ a spokesperson said. 

‘The outcome of that investigation will be shared by the IOPC with the families, coroner and ourselves at a later date.

‘As a result, Devon and Cornwall Police is unable to comment further on any matters that are subject to independent investigation and review.’

The National Police Chiefs’ Council is also leading an inquiry into the force’s firearms policies and procedures.    

‘This was a review commissioned by the force following events in August 2021,’ the force spokesman added. 

‘The review is not an investigation of any potential fault by an individual or the organisation.

‘It focuses on the processes within the Firearms Licensing Unit, compliance with Home Office guidelines and most importantly ensuring we have the national best practice available to us as we move forward.’   

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