Two more children die after Ukraine rail station bombing

Two more children die after Ukraine rail station bombing: Tragic toll of youngsters killed by Putin’s missile hits SEVEN as bloodied cuddly toy is sent to UN as evidence of war crimes

  • Ukraine’s defence ministry announced the two deaths on Twitter on Thursday 
  • They come after a busy Kramatorsk station was struck by two missiles last week
  • Thousands of civilians were at the station evacuating eastern Ukraine to go west
  • The two deaths brings the death toll to 59. Hundreds were left wounded 
  • Ukraine said it would send a blood-covered soft toy to the UN as evidence 

Two more children have succumbed to injuries sustained in an alleged Russian air strike on Kramatorsk train station last week, taking the death toll to 59 – including seven children – Ukraine’s defence ministry has said.

The ministry announced the deaths on Twitter today, along with a picture of a child’s cuddly horse toy – covered in blood – that was found at the station after the attack.

‘A bloody children’s toy will be sent by (Ukraine’s national police) to the UN as proof of this barbaric crime,’ the ministry said in its statement.

The strike by two missiles, believed to be Russian, was carried out on April 8 when thousands of people were at the station in eastern Ukraine trying to flee west away from Russian forces preparing an assault on the region.

Around 4,000 civilians were thought to be in and around the railway station when the missiles hit. Hundreds were injured, and while the initial death toll was reported to be around 30, the figure has since risen to 59. 

Two more children have succumbed to injuries sustained in an alleged Russian air strike on Kramatorsk train station last week, taking the death toll to 59 – including seven children – Ukraine’s defence ministry has said 

Ukraine’s defence ministry announced the deaths on Twitter today, along with a picture of a child’s stuffed horse – covered in blood – that was found at the station after the attack

Pictured: An injured child, who survived the missile attack on the Kramatorsk station on April 8th, get treatment at paediatric intensive care in a hospital in the city of Dnipro, April 14, 2022

In the days prior, Ukrainian officials had urged people living in the eastern regions of Ukraine to evacuate as Moscow refocused its military efforts on the Donbas region.

Graphic pictures of the aftermath of the strike showed bodies strewn across the floor, lying amongst luggage and children’s prams outside the busy station.  

Although Moscow denied the attack, claiming it was launched by Ukraine, analysts said the wreckage of one of the two missiles that hit the station was Russian.

The attack sparked international outrage against Russia and led to Western countries imposing even harsher sanctions on the Kremlin.

News of the two children’s deaths came after a a fake BBC News report making out Ukraine was behind a deadly missile attack on its own people was spread online by pro-Russian sources.

The broadcaster on Wednesday urged people to ignore the video, which uses the corporation’s logo and same red and white coloured graphics.

Injured children, who survived the missile attack on the Kramatorsk station on April 8th, get treatment at paediatric intensive care in a hospital in the city of Dnipro, Ukraine on April 14

Two children died on Thursday, bringing the total number of children killed in the air strike to seven and the overall death toll to 59

A fragment of a Tochka-U missile lies on the ground following an attack at the railway station in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 8, 2022

A man lays flowers as volunteers look for traces to help identify the corpses at Kramatorsk railway station after the missile attack in  Ukraine on April 09, 2022

The clip gave the false impression that Ukrainian armed forces were responsible for the missile attack on refugees in Kramatorsk.  

Meanwhile, Ukraine said Thursday it was reopening humanitarian corridors allowing for the evacuation of civilians from war-scarred regions after a day-long pause that Kyiv attributed to Russian violations.

Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk said in a statement on social media that nine routes in the east and south of the country would be operating a day after they were shut because routes, she had said, were ‘too dangerous’.

‘Humanitarian corridors in the Lugansk region will be run under the condition of cessation of shelling by the occupying forces,’ Vereshchuk said Thursday.

A view of people’s belongings and bloodstains on the ground after a missile strike on a railway station in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, in this picture uploaded on April 8, 2022

Ukrainian authorities have been urging people in the southeastern Donbas area to quickly move west in advance of a feared, large-scale Russian offensive to capture its composite regions, Donetsk and Lugansk.

British military intelligence said on Thursday that the Ukrainian towns of Kramatorsk and Kostiantynivka are likely to be targeted by Russia for levels of violence seen in other urban centres since Moscow invaded Ukraine in late February.

In an update on the war, Britain’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) said that ‘widespread missile and artillery strikes and efforts to concentrate forces for an offensive’ showed a reversion to traditional Russian military doctrine.

The MoD added that Ukraine’s continued defence of Mariupol was currently tying down significant numbers of Russian troops and equipment. 

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