University lecturer digs up coin dating back 660 years in his garden

Stunned university lecturer digs up medieval silver coin dating back 660 years to the time of Edward III while tending to raspberry bush in his back garden

  • Dr Jamie Pringle was gardening with his children at his home in Stoke-on-Trent
  • The senior lecturer in geosciences at Keele University noticed the coin in the soil
  • Following Saturday’s find he had it confirmed by experts to be 660 years old
  • The 46-year-old can now keep or sell the coin worth in the region of £350

A university lecture was stunned after finding a medieval coin dating back 660 years while weeding his garden  

Dr Jamie Pringle was attending to a raspberry bush while gardening with his two children at his home in Stoke-on-Trent on Saturday before noticing the artefact in the soil.

The senior lecturer in geosciences at Keele University dug into patch where he was shocked to discover a nearly fully intact metal coin.

University lecturer Dr Jamie Pringle stands with his 660-year-old coin found while gardening


The object he uncovered was a silver groat from the time of Edward III which experts have dated to either 1352 or 1353

After having it examined by experts it was confirmed to be a silver half groat from the time of Edward III dating it to either 1352 or 1353. 

‘I’d let the weeds get a bit carried away so thought I’d tidy the place up and do some weeding,’ the 46-year-old said.

‘I was turning the soil over when I suddenly saw something metal. It wasn’t very shiny but looked like a coin. I thought it might be an old 50p pence.

‘It looked a bit weird, I thought it looked quite old, then I saw the cross on it. I got in touch with the local archaeology service who confirmed it was from the reign of Edward III.

‘I don’t know what happened or why it was there. It is quite exciting.’

Dr Pringle was gardening with his children before noticing the coin in the soil among weeds

He can keep the coin he found in his garden or sell it as it is not classified as treasure

Dr Pringle is now free to keep or sell the amazing discovery if he wishes as his find is a solitary coin rather than being part of a hoard which would qualify it as treasure.

Should he take it to an auction it could fetch up to £350 based on current values of medieval coins. 

Staffordshire’s finds liaison officer Victoria Allnatt said it was the only coin of its kind found within the city and was minted in London. 

‘When we plot those on a map, this example found by Jamie is the only one discovered in the city itself.

‘The next nearest one was discovered in Barlaston and then Draycott in the Moors.’

 

 

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