Who is Ray Epps?

A NEW video of the January 6 Capitol riots has surfaced, showing a man who appears to be Ray Epps leading the crowd beyond the gates.

Charges have not been brought against Epps for the Capitol riots.

Who is Ray Epps?

Epps is a resident of Queen Creek, Arizona, and is the owner of the Knotty Barn wedding venue. The information on the website says Epps grew up on a cattle farm, spending most of his career as a contractor.

His work led him to Las Vegas where he met his future wife, Robyn, who hired Epps to fix the leaker roof at apartments owned by her employer.

The couple moved back to Queen Creek in 2010 and bought a 5-acre farm, and named it Rocking R Farms.

When their farm started to deteriorate from competitors selling grass-fed beef, Epps and his wife decided to turn their farm into a wedding venue, the wedding site says.

Epps is also listed alongside Robyn as an officer for Patriot Holdings, LLC which is listed as an alternative commercial real estate company.

However, according to Open Corporates, The Open Database of The Corporate World, Epps and his wife Robyn were removed from their roles as officers on May 8, 2021.

The site does not give a reason for their "removal."

Did he storm the Capitol Building?

In a House oversight hearing on October 21, Attorney General Merrick Garland testified about the January 6 Capitol riots.

U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie of Kentucky questioned Garland about a video shown from the riots that appears to show Epps advocating for people to go into the Capitol.

The video was shown several times throughout Garland’s questioning, but he refused to respond.

“I'm not going to comment on an investigation that's ongoing," he said.

Massie posted a video of Garland testifying on Twitter and said, “I questioned Attorney General Garland about whether there were Federal Agents present on 1/6 and whether they agitated to go into the Capitol. Attorney-General Garland refused to answer.”

In the video that surfaced from the day before the Capitol riots, Epps is apparently heard saying, “We need to go into the Capitol.”

A spokesperson for Ray Epps did not respond to a request for comment in time for this article.

AZCentral reported Epps said he needed to see the video, but when sent a transcript of his comments, he said, “The only thing that meant is we would go in the doors like everyone else. It was totally, totally wrong the way they went in.”

There is no evidence in the video that Epps ever entered the Capitol building.

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